What Is A Priority Nursing Diagnosis For A Child In The Subacute Stage Of Kawasaki Disease

Kawasaki disease is a rare, but serious, illness that affects the blood vessels. It is most common in children between the ages of 5 and 10 years old, but can occur in any age group. The subacute stage is the second stage of Kawasaki disease, and usually lasts for 2 to 3 weeks.

A priority nursing diagnosis for a child in the subacute stage of Kawasaki disease is vasculitis, or inflammation of the blood vessels. Other possible diagnoses include:

• Infection

• Inflammation

• Allergic reaction

If your child is diagnosed with Kawasaki disease, it is important to monitor their temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure regularly. You should also watch for any signs of infection, such as a fever, sore throat, or swollen glands.

If your child is experiencing any of the following symptoms, seek medical attention immediately:

• A fever of 102°F (38.9°C) or higher

• A rapid heart rate

• Redness, swelling, or pain in the hands or feet

There is no cure for Kawasaki disease, but it can be treated with antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Most children make a full recovery, but some may experience long-term health problems, such as heart disease.

Which symptoms would the nurse anticipate in a child with Kawasaki disease Select all that apply?

Which symptoms would the nurse anticipate in a child with Kawasaki disease? Select all that apply.

The child may experience a high fever that lasts for more than five days.

The child may have a rash on the chest and abdomen.

The child may have swollen lymph nodes.

The child may have red, dry, cracked lips.

The child may have red, swollen eyes.

The child may have swollen hands and feet.

Which clinical finding should the nurse expect a child with nephrosis to exhibit?

A child with nephrosis may exhibit various clinical findings, including edema, hypertension, and proteinuria. Edema is the most common sign of nephrosis, and it is often most noticeable in the face and around the eyes. Hypertension may develop as the child’s kidneys fail to adequately filter blood. Proteinuria, or the presence of protein in the urine, is also common in children with nephrosis and may be an early sign of the disease.

What is the major health concern of children in the United States?

The major health concern of children in the United States is obesity. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), obesity rates have more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents in the past thirty years. Obesity is a serious health concern because it can lead to a number of chronic health conditions, including heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and cancer.

There are a number of factors that contribute to childhood obesity, including poor diet and lack of exercise. The rise of technology has also played a role, as children are now spending more time than ever playing video games and watching television instead of being active.

There are a number of steps that parents can take to help their children stay healthy, including making sure they have a healthy diet and getting them involved in physical activity. It is also important to set a good example for children by being active and eating healthy yourself.

When performing physical examination in an infant the following are appropriate nursing actions?

When performing a physical examination on an infant, the following are appropriate nursing actions:

1. Introduce yourself to the infant and explain the examination process.

2. Observe the infant’s general appearance and body proportions.

3. Check the infant’s head for size, shape, and symmetry.

4. Examine the infant’s eyes, ears, nose, and mouth.

5. Check the infant’s neck for size and shape.

6. Examine the infant’s chest for size and shape.

7. Check the infant’s abdomen for size and shape.

8. Examine the infant’s back for shape and curvature.

9. Check the infant’s hips and legs for size and proportion.

10. Check the infant’s arms and hands for size and proportion.

What are the 3 stages of Kawasaki disease?

Kawasaki disease (KD) is a rare, life-threatening illness that affects children. The disease has three stages: acute stage, subacute stage, and convalescent stage.

The acute stage is the most serious, and it can last for up to two weeks. The child may have a high fever, a rash, swollen lymph nodes, and red, swollen eyes. The subacute stage can last for up to two months, and the child may have a low fever, a rash, and swollen lymph nodes. The convalescent stage can last for up to six months, and the child may have a low fever and a rash.

Kawasaki disease can cause serious health problems, such as heart damage, and it requires treatment with antibiotics and immunoglobulin therapy. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential for preventing long-term health problems.

What is Kawasaki disease in children?

What is Kawasaki disease in children?

Kawasaki disease (KD) is a rare, serious illness that mainly affects children. It causes inflammation and damage to the blood vessels throughout the body.

The cause of KD is unknown, but it is thought to be an autoimmune reaction.

KD often causes a high fever, a rash, swollen lymph nodes, and red, swollen hands and feet.

If left untreated, KD can lead to heart damage, including an increased risk of heart attack, stroke, and death.

KD is treated with antibiotics and high doses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a medication made from human antibodies.

Most children who develop KD recover fully, but some may have long-term heart problems.

KD is relatively rare, occurring in only about 1 in every 100,000 children.

What are the symptoms of Kawasaki disease in children?

The main symptoms of KD are a high fever, a rash, swollen lymph nodes, and red, swollen hands and feet.

How is Kawasaki disease diagnosed in children?

KD is diagnosed by ruling out other causes of the child’s symptoms and by identifying specific antibodies in the blood.

How is Kawasaki disease treated in children?

KD is treated with antibiotics and high doses of IVIG.

Most children who develop KD recover fully, but some may have long-term heart problems.

What is the nursing diagnosis for a child with severe edema caused from nephrotic syndrome it is risk for?

What is the nursing diagnosis for a child with severe edema caused from nephrotic syndrome it is risk for?

Nephrotic syndrome is a rare disorder that affects the kidneys. It can cause severe edema, or swelling, in the child. The edema is due to a loss of protein in the urine, which can lead to a build-up of fluid in the tissues. This can cause the child to become very ill, and they may even require hospitalization.

The nursing diagnosis for a child with severe edema caused from nephrotic syndrome is risk for. This means that the child is at risk for developing further complications, such as respiratory distress, due to the edema. The nurse will work to keep the child safe and comfortable, and will monitor them for any signs of distress.