What Age Can A Child Decide Which Parent To Live With In Nc

There is no definitive answer as to when a child can decide which parent to live with in North Carolina. In general, the age of majority in North Carolina is 18, but a child can petition the court to be emancipated at a younger age. In order to make a decision about which parent to live with, a child typically needs to be older and have a greater understanding of the situation.

In some cases, a child may choose to live with one parent over the other even if both parents are still living together. If this is the case, the child’s wishes should be taken into consideration by the court. However, the court will also look at a variety of other factors, such as the child’s age, the relationship between the parents, and the child’s living arrangements.

If you are facing a situation in which your child needs to decide which parent to live with, it is important to seek legal advice. An attorney can help you understand your rights and the options available to you.

Can a 12 year old decide which parent to live with in NC?

Can a 12 year old decide which parent to live with in NC?

Yes, in North Carolina, a twelve year old can decide which parent to live with, as long as both parents agree to it. If the parents can’t agree, the court will decide.

Can a child refuse visitation in NC?

Can a child refuse visitation in NC?

In North Carolina, parents have a legal right to visitation with their children. This right is granted to parents regardless of whether they are married to each other or not. However, a child can refuse visitation if they have a valid reason for doing so.

If a child is refusing visitation, the parent who is trying to exercise their right to visitation must go to court and ask a judge to order the child to comply. The judge will listen to both the parent and the child, and will make a decision based on what is in the best interests of the child.

If the child is refusing visitation because of abuse or neglect by the parent, the judge will likely order the child to comply with the visitation order. However, if the child is refusing visitation for any other reason, the judge will likely consider the child’s reasons and make a decision based on that.

When Can child decide which parent to live with NC?

When parents divorce, one of the most difficult decisions they face is determining who their child will live with. North Carolina law provides that the child has a right to live with both parents, but the child can also choose to live with one parent over the other. This is known as the “best interests of the child” standard.

The court will consider a variety of factors when making this determination, including the child’s age, the relationship between the child and each parent, and the child’s wishes if he or she is old enough to express them. The court will also look at the parents’ ability to cooperate and make decisions together for the child.

If the parents cannot agree on who the child should live with, the court will make the decision for them. The court will consider the child’s best interests in making this determination, and the child’s wishes if he or she is old enough to express them.

What happens when a child refuses to go with a parent?

What happens when a child refuses to go with a parent?

There are a few different things that could happen in this situation. The child could be trying to assert their independence and may simply need some time to adjust to the new situation. Alternatively, the child could be scared or uncomfortable and may need some reassurance from the parent. In some cases, the child may have a valid reason for refusing to go with the parent, such as a fear of being left alone or a bad experience in the past.

If the child is trying to assert their independence, the parent should try to respect their wishes as much as possible. However, the parent should also make sure that the child is safe and not putting themselves in danger. If the child is scared or uncomfortable, the parent should try to reassure them and help them feel comfortable. If the child has a valid reason for refusing to go with the parent, the parent should try to understand and address the child’s concerns.

Who has custody of a child when the parents are not married in North Carolina?

When parents are not married, the custody of their children is determined by the law of the state where the children reside. In North Carolina, the law favors awarding custody to the parent who has been the children’s primary caregiver. If the parents cannot agree on custody, the court will make a determination based on the best interests of the children.

The custodial parent has the right to make decisions about the children’s education, religion, and health care. The non-custodial parent typically has the right to visitation, although the court can order supervised visitation if it is in the children’s best interests. If the non-custodial parent fails to comply with the visitation order, the custodial parent can seek to have the order enforced by the court.

How much does it cost to file for custody in NC?

If you are a resident of North Carolina and are seeking custody of a child, you will likely need to file a custody action with the court. The cost of filing for custody in North Carolina can vary depending on the court in which you file and the nature of your case.

In North Carolina, there are two types of custody: legal custody and physical custody. Legal custody refers to the right and responsibility to make decisions about a child’s upbringing, while physical custody refers to the right to have a child live with you. In most cases, parents will share custody of their child, with each parent having legal custody and both parents having physical custody.

In order to file for custody in North Carolina, you will need to petition the court and provide evidence that shows why you should be awarded custody of the child. The court will also consider the child’s best interests when making a custody determination. If you are unable to afford to hire an attorney to help you with your custody case, you may be able to find free or low-cost legal assistance from a local legal aid office.

The cost of filing for custody in North Carolina can vary depending on the court in which you file and the nature of your case. However, in most cases, the cost will be between $200 and $300.

Is North Carolina a mom State?

Is North Carolina a mom State?

There is no definitive answer to this question, as it depends on how one defines “mom state.” Some people might say that North Carolina is a mom state because it has a high percentage of mothers who stay at home with their children. Others might say that North Carolina is a mom state because it has a high number of daycare centers per capita.

One factor that might contribute to North Carolina being considered a mom state is the fact that it has a high number of stay-at-home mothers. A recent study by the Pew Research Center found that 28% of North Carolina mothers stay at home with their children, compared to the national average of 23%. While this may not seem like a large difference, it is important to note that North Carolina is one of only 12 states where more than a quarter of mothers stay at home.

Another factor that might contribute to North Carolina being considered a mom state is the fact that it has a high number of daycare centers per capita. A recent study by Child Care Aware of America found that there are 2,022 daycare centers in North Carolina, which is the seventh highest number in the country.

So, is North Carolina a mom state? It depends on how one defines “mom state.” If one defines it as a state with a high percentage of stay-at-home mothers, then North Carolina is definitely a mom state. If one defines it as a state with a high number of daycare centers per capita, then North Carolina is also a mom state.