The Learner In Milgram’s Study Quizlet

In 1961, Stanley Milgram, a social psychologist at Yale University, conducted a study to investigate the willingness of people to obey authority figures. The study became infamous for its shocking results, which showed that a majority of participants were willing to administer potentially deadly electric shocks to a learner in order to please an authority figure.

Milgram’s study was based on the idea of the “agentic state.” This is the idea that people can be induced to act in ways that are contrary to their personal beliefs or values by following the orders of an authority figure. Milgram’s study sought to explore the extent to which people are willing to obey authority figures, even when it means harming others.

The study involved a series of experiments in which participants were asked to administer electric shocks to a learner. The shocks were increasing in voltage, and started at 15 volts, increasing in 15-volt increments to a maximum of 450 volts. The learner was a confederate of the experimenter, and was not actually being shocked.

The experimenter explained to the participants that the shocks were being administered as part of a learning experiment, and that the learner had to memorize a list of word pairs. The experimenter also explained that the shocks were not actually harmful, but that the learner might find them unpleasant.

The participants were randomly assigned to one of two roles: the role of the teacher, or the role of the learner. The teacher was given a list of word pairs to memorize, and was then asked to read the first word of the pair to the learner. The learner was then asked to say the second word of the pair. If the learner got the answer wrong, the teacher was to administer a shock, with the voltage increasing with each wrong answer.

The experiment was designed so that the teacher could not see the learner, and could only hear their responses. This was done in order to increase the sense of anonymity and distance between the teacher and the learner.

The results of Milgram’s study were shocking. A majority of participants (65%) were willing to administer the maximum shock of 450 volts, even when the learner pleaded for them to stop.

Milgram’s study has been criticized for its unethical nature. The shocks were, in fact, real, and there was a risk that the learner could have been seriously injured or even killed. However, the study does provide valuable insight into the power of authority figures and the extent to which people are willing to obey them.

Who was the learner in Milgram experiment?

The learner in the Milgram experiment was Stanley Milgram’s friend and colleague, Arthur Stanley.

What did we learn from the Milgram obedience Study quizlet?

On January 27, 2014, a quizlet entitled “What did we learn from the Milgram obedience Study” was published on the social learning platform Quizlet. The quizlet was designed to test students’ knowledge of Stanley Milgram’s infamous obedience study, which was conducted in the early 1960s.

The Milgram obedience study was conducted to explore the extent to which people would obey an authority figure who instructed them to perform unethical acts. In the study, participants were asked to deliver electric shocks to another participant, who was actually a confederate of the experimenter, for increasingly high levels of voltage. Shockingly, the majority of participants were willing to deliver the highest levels of voltage, even when the confederate screamed in pain and pleaded for them to stop.

The Milgram obedience study has been cited as a key study in our understanding of the Holocaust and other instances of mass atrocity. It has also been used to explore the concept of obedience to authority, which is a topic that continues to be debated among psychologists.

What was learned from the Milgram study?

The Milgram study was a series of experiments conducted by Stanley Milgram in the early 1960s that aimed to measure the willingness of people to obey authority figures. The study became infamous for its revelation that a large number of people are willing to inflict pain on others, even to the point of killing them, when ordered to do so by an authority figure.

The study has been criticized for its unethical methods and the troubling implications of its results, but it has also been hailed as a landmark study in the understanding of human behavior. It has provided valuable insights into the ways that people can be coerced into doing terrible things, and it has helped to shape the way that researchers think about the role of obedience in human behavior.

Why did the participants obey in Milgram’s study?

In Stanley Milgram’s obedience study, participants were asked to administer electric shocks to another person, even if they were uncomfortable doing so. Milgram found that a majority of participants were willing to obey the experimenter and administer shocks, even if it caused the other person pain.

There are several possible explanations for why the participants in Milgram’s study were so willing to obey. One reason may be that the participants were merely following the orders of the experimenter. They may have believed that it was not their place to question the experimenter’s authority.

Another possible explanation is that the participants were afraid of being punished if they did not comply with the experimenter’s orders. The experimenter made it clear that those who did not obey would be punished, and this may have caused the participants to feel anxious and scared.

Finally, it is possible that the participants were influenced by the social pressure of the group. The other participants in the study may have been willing to administer shocks, and this may have caused the participants to feel like they had to do the same.

What was the purpose of the Milgram experiment quizlet?

The Milgram experiment quizlet was conducted in order to study the effects of authority on obedience. The experiment was designed by Stanley Milgram, a social psychologist, in 1961. It was conducted at Yale University. Participants were given the task of administering electric shocks to another person, who was actually a confederate of the experimenter, in order to study how obedient people would be to authority figures.

What lesson did Psychologists most likely learn from the Milgram experiment quizlet?

The Milgram experiment quizlet was conducted in order to determine the likelihood that people would obey an authority figure, even if it meant inflicting pain on another person. The results of the experiment showed that a majority of people would obey an authority figure, even if it meant hurting another person.

Psychologists who conducted the Milgram experiment quizlet likely learned that people are more likely to obey authority figures than they may think. This information can be used to help create better training programs for people who work in positions of authority, as well as to help people understand the dangers of blindly following orders.

What were the results of the Milgram experiment quizlet?

What were the results of the Milgram experiment quizlet?

The Milgram experiment was conducted to determine the willingness of participants to obey an authority figure. The quizlet quizlet results indicated that a majority of the participants were willing to obey the authority figure, even if it meant hurting someone else. The experiment has been used to help explain why people have participated in mass atrocities throughout history.