In Stanley Milgram’s Classic Study A Participant

In Stanley Milgram’s classic study, a participant was required to administer electric shocks to another person, purportedly for the purpose of learning. The shocks were fake, but the participant was not aware of this. The participant was given a series of questions to ask the other person, and was instructed to increase the voltage of the shocks with each wrong answer.

The participant was not allowed to stop the experiment, even if it appeared that the other person was in pain. In reality, the other person was not being harmed in any way, but the participant did not know this.

This study is controversial because it raises questions about the extent to which people will obey authority figures. It is also disturbing because it suggests that people are capable of inflicting pain on others, even if they do not want to.

What happened in the Stanley Milgram experiment?

The Stanley Milgram experiment was a study conducted in the early 1960s to measure the willingness of participants to obey an authority figure. The experiment was controversial due to the harsh conditions participants were subjected to, and the ethical implications of the study.

The study was conducted by Stanley Milgram, a Yale University psychologist. The participants were asked to administer electric shocks to another participant, who was in another room, every time they answered a question incorrectly. The shocks were gradually increased in intensity, up to potentially lethal levels.

Shockingly, the majority of participants were willing to administer the shocks, even when the other participant was screaming in pain and begging to be released. This study has been used to explain the phenomenon of obedience to authority, and the willingness of people to inflict harm on others under orders from a figure of authority.

What did Milgram tell his participants?

What Milgram told his participants was that they were participating in a study on the effects of punishment on learning. He told them that they would be given a task to complete, and that for every incorrect answer they gave, they would be given an electric shock. Milgram also told his participants that the shocks were increasing in intensity with each incorrect answer.

What did the Milgram experiment show about humans quizlet?

The Milgram experiment was a study conducted in the early 1960s by Stanley Milgram, which aimed to measure the extent to which people would obey an authority figure given a set of commands. The study found that a majority of participants were willing to obey even if it meant inflicting pain on another person.

The study was conducted in three parts. In the first, participants were asked to read a list of words aloud, and then were asked to recall as many of the words as they could. In the second, participants were asked to administer electric shocks to another person (who was actually an actor) every time they made a mistake while reading the list of words. The shocks were fake, but the actor pretended to be in pain. In the third part, the experiment was repeated, but this time the participant was in a room with the actor and could see and hear them.

The study found that a majority of participants were willing to obey even if it meant inflicting pain on another person. In the third part of the study, when participants could see and hear the actor, the number of participants who were willing to continue giving shocks decreased, but a still majority were willing to do so.

What did the experimenter in the Milgram obedience studies do to get the participants?

The experimenter in the Milgram obedience studies did a few things to get the participants to comply with his requests. First, he made it clear that he was in charge and that the participants were to do what he said. He also used an authoritative tone of voice, which made the participants feel like they had to do what he said. Additionally, the experimenter gave the participants a false sense of authority, telling them that they were helping to study the effects of punishment on learning. This made the participants feel like they were doing something important and that their participation was needed.

Which statement about the Milgram obedience study is true?

The Milgram obedience study is a well-known psychology experiment that aimed to measure the willingness of participants to obey an authority figure. The study has been the source of much debate, as it produced some controversial findings.

The most famous result of the Milgram obedience study is the finding that a high percentage of participants were willing to administer what they thought were potentially lethal electric shocks to another person, simply because they were instructed to do so by an authority figure.

However, not all experts agree that this finding is accurate. Some argue that the shocking results of the study may have been due to the fact that the participants were not actually given electric shocks, but were simply told that they were.

There is still much debate surrounding the Milgram obedience study, and the true statement about its findings is still up for debate.

What did Stanley Milgram believe?

Stanley Milgram was an American social psychologist who is best known for his controversial experiment on obedience to authority, which demonstrated that people are often willing to comply with orders from an authority figure even when they believe that those orders are wrong. Milgram’s work has been influential in both the social sciences and in popular culture, and he has been described as one of the most important figures in the history of social psychology.

Milgram is perhaps best known for his obedience experiment, in which he demonstrated that people are often willing to comply with orders from an authority figure even when they believe that those orders are wrong. In the experiment, participants were asked to administer electrical shocks to another person (who was actually an actor) every time that person answered a question incorrectly. The shocks were not real, but the participants were told that they were, and most of them were willing to administer shocks that were increasingly severe in order to comply with the orders of the authority figure.

Milgram’s obedience experiment has been criticized for its methodological flaws, but it has been widely cited in both the social sciences and in popular culture. It has been used to help explain everything from the Holocaust to the Abu Ghraib torture scandal. Milgram’s work has also been influential in the development of social psychology as a discipline, and he is considered one of the most important figures in the history of the field.

What was the purpose of the Milgram experiment quizlet?

The Milgram experiment quizlet was conducted to study the willingness of people to obey authority. The experiment was conducted in the 1960s by Stanley Milgram, a social psychologist.