How Old Before A Child Can Decide What Parent To Live With In Florida

There is no set age in Florida law specifying when a child is able to decide which parent to live with. The determination of which parent a child will live with is based on the best interests of the child. In making this determination, the court will consider a variety of factors, including the child’s age, the relationship the child has with each parent, the parents’ ability to care for the child, and the child’s home environment.

Generally, the younger the child, the more likely the court will be to award custody to the parent the child has been living with most of the time. However, there is no hard and fast rule, and the court will consider all of the relevant factors in making its determination.

If you are facing a custody dispute and would like to know what to expect, you should speak to an experienced family law attorney. An attorney can help you understand the law in your state and advise you on the best course of action to take in your particular situation.

Can a 12 year old decide which parent to live with in Florida?

Can a 12 year old decide which parent to live with in Florida?

In Florida, the law says that a child can choose which parent to live with, as long as the child is 12 years old or older. The child’s decision will be based on what is in the child’s best interests. If the child is younger than 12, the court will make the decision based on what is in the child’s best interests.

There are a few things that the court will consider when deciding what is in the child’s best interests. The court will look at things like the child’s relationship with each parent, the parents’ abilities to care for the child, the parents’ willingness to cooperate with each other, and the child’s wishes, if the child is old enough to express them.

If the parents can’t agree on what is in the child’s best interests, the court will make the decision for them.

What age can a child refuse to go with a parent in Florida?

Florida law allows children of any age to refuse to go with a parent, as long as they have a reasonable basis for doing so. If a child is under the age of 18, however, their parent or legal guardian may be able to petition a court for an order requiring the child to comply with their parent’s wishes.

Generally, a child’s refusal to go with a parent will be based on their fear of being abused or harmed by the parent. If this is the case, the child’s best interests should be considered by the court in making its decision. If the child is old enough to express their own views, the court will also take into account their opinion on whether it is safe for them to go with their parent.

At what age can a child speak for themselves in court in Florida?

In Florida, the age at which a child can speak for themselves in court is 7. This is based on the Florida Supreme Court case of In re: T.L.O., which held that “the child’s age and understanding should be taken into account in assessing the reliability of the child’s statements.” 

The age of 7 is also the age at which a child is allowed to give sworn testimony in court.

Is Florida a pro Mom state?

Is Florida a pro-mom state? This is a question that can be difficult to answer definitively. However, there are a few things that could be considered in answering this question.

One factor that could be looked at is the state’s policies when it comes to working mothers. Florida does have a number of policies in place that are beneficial to working mothers. For example, the state offers paid family leave. This policy allows mothers to take time off to care for a new child without having to worry about losing their job.

Florida also offers a number of tax credits that are beneficial to working mothers. For example, the state offers a child care tax credit. This credit helps working mothers offset the cost of child care.

Another factor that could be looked at is the availability of child care in Florida. Florida has a number of child care providers, and the cost of child care is relatively affordable. This makes it easier for mothers to find child care that fits their budget.

Overall, Florida is a state that is friendly to working mothers. The state has a number of policies in place that make it easier for mothers to balance work and family life. Additionally, the cost of child care is relatively affordable, and there are a number of child care providers available.

Is Florida a mother’s right state?

There is no easy answer to this question. Some people might say that Florida is a mother’s right state because it offers a number of benefits and protections to mothers. Others might say that Florida is not a mother’s right state because it does not have a specific law that guarantees certain rights to mothers.

One of the benefits that Florida offers to mothers is a parenting plan. This plan is a document that helps to outline the parenting arrangements between the parents. It can be used to help make decisions about things like custody, visitation, and child support. The parenting plan can be tailored to meet the specific needs of the family.

Florida also offers a number of protections to mothers. For example, the state has a law that prohibits employers from discriminating against mothers. This law protects mothers from being fired or discriminated against because they are pregnant or have children.

Florida also has a number of laws that deal with child custody and visitation. These laws help to ensure that both parents have a meaningful relationship with their children after a divorce.

While Florida does offer a number of benefits and protections to mothers, it does not have a specific law that guarantees these rights. This means that mothers in Florida may not have the same level of protection as mothers in other states.

Is Florida a 50/50 child custody State?

In Florida, child custody is determined based on the best interests of the child. This means that the court will consider a number of factors when making a determination, including the parents’ wishes, the child’s wishes, the relationship between the parents and the child, and the child’s home environment.

Generally, the court will award custody to one parent or the other, but there is also the possibility of a 50/50 custody arrangement. This means that the parents share custody equally, with each parent having parenting time with the child for approximately the same amount of time.

There are a number of factors that the court will consider when determining whether a 50/50 custody arrangement is in the child’s best interests. These factors include the parents’ ability to cooperate and make joint decisions, the child’s age and needs, the parents’ work schedules, and the distance between the parents’ homes.

If the court determines that a 50/50 custody arrangement is not in the child’s best interests, it may award custody to one parent and parenting time to the other parent. Alternatively, the court may order that the parents share custody but with different parenting time arrangements.

Do I have to pay child support if I have 50/50 custody in Florida?

Florida is one of the states that follows the 50/50 custody rule for child support. This means that, as long as both parents have equal custody of the child, neither parent is required to pay child support.

There are, however, a few things to keep in mind. First, if one parent has significantly more custody than the other, the parent with less custody may be required to pay child support. Additionally, if one parent has sole custody of the child, that parent will be required to pay child support.

If you have any questions about child support and custody in Florida, you should speak to an attorney.