At What Age Can A Child Refuse Visitation In Pa

A child in Pennsylvania can refuse visitation rights to a parent at any age, according to state law. The child’s reasons for refusing visitation must be considered by the court, and the court will make a determination based on what is in the child’s best interest.

Generally, a child will not be able to refuse visitation if the child is younger than 12 years old. However, a child’s wishes will be taken into account if the child is older than 12.

If one parent is trying to prevent the other parent from having visitation, the court will look at a variety of factors to determine what is in the child’s best interest. These factors may include the child’s relationship with each parent, the child’s age, and the parents’ ability to cooperate.

If you are facing a situation in which your child is refusing visitation, it is important to speak to an attorney. The attorneys at Saile & Saile LLP can help you understand your rights and the best way to proceed.

At what age will a judge listen to a child in PA?

Pennsylvania law allows for children to testify in court at the age of 12. However, judges have some discretion in whether to actually listen to the child’s testimony. There are a few factors that a judge will likely consider when making this decision.

The first factor is whether the child is competent to testify. This determination will be made by the judge after hearing from both the child and the child’s attorney. The child must be able to understand the questions that are being asked and must be able to provide coherent answers.

The second factor is whether the child’s testimony is necessary. The judge will consider whether the child’s testimony is relevant to the case and whether it is more likely to help or hurt the case.

The third factor is the age and maturity of the child. The judge will consider how well the child can understand the proceedings and how well the child can express themselves.

The fourth factor is the nature of the case. The judge will consider how traumatic it would be for the child to testify and whether the child’s testimony is likely to be credible.

If a child is found to be competent and their testimony is determined to be relevant and necessary, the judge will likely listen to the child’s testimony. However, the judge has the discretion to decide not to listen to the child’s testimony if it is determined that it would be too traumatic or that the child is not credible.

Can a 13 year old decide which parent to live with in PA?

Pennsylvania law does not expressly provide a right for a 13-year-old to decide which parent to live with. In general, the age of majority in Pennsylvania is 18, meaning that a person is legally considered an adult at that age. A child under the age of majority is generally considered to be a minor.

There are a few limited situations in which a child who is under the age of majority may be able to decide which parent to live with. For example, if a child is married, he or she may be able to choose which parent to live with. In addition, if a child is emancipated, he or she may be able to choose which parent to live with.

Emancipation is a legal process that allows a child to become an adult before he or she reaches the age of majority. There are a few ways that a child can become emancipated. One way is for a child to get married. Another way is for a child to get a job and support him or herself. A child can also become emancipated if he or she goes to court and gets a judge to declare that he or she is an adult.

If a child is not emancipated, the age of majority generally controls who the child lives with. In most cases, a child will live with the parent who has custody of the child. If parents do not have custody of their child, the child will live with the person who has been appointed as the child’s guardian by a court.

It is important to remember that these general rules may not apply in every situation. If you have questions about who your child can live with, you should speak to an attorney who can help you understand the law in your specific case.”

What do I do if my child doesn’t want to see his dad?

There are a few different things that you can do if your child doesn’t want to see his dad. You can try to talk to your child about why he doesn’t want to see his dad, and you can also try to encourage a relationship between your child and his dad. If your child is still unwilling to see his dad, you can try to set up some rules or boundaries that will make it easier for your child to have a relationship with his dad.

What happens when a child refuses to go with a parent?

When a child refuses to go with a parent, there are generally two possible outcomes: the child either goes with the parent or the child stays where they are. If the child goes with the parent, the situation is usually resolved quickly. However, if the child stays where they are, the situation can become complicated and may require the help of authorities.

If the child goes with the parent, the situation is usually resolved quickly. This is because the child is usually more willing to go with a parent than with someone else. In most cases, the child will simply follow the parent without any trouble.

However, if the child stays where they are, the situation can become complicated. This is because the child may not want to go with the parent for a variety of reasons. For example, the child may not like the parent or may not trust the parent. In some cases, the child may be afraid of the parent.

If the child refuses to go with the parent, the situation can become dangerous. This is because the child may be vulnerable to exploitation or abuse. For this reason, it is important to take the situation seriously and to seek help from authorities if necessary.

At what age can a child decide not to see a parent?

Parents often wonder at what age their child can decide not to see them. The answer to this question is that there is no definitive answer. Each child is different and will reach this decision at different times in their lives. However, there are some general things to keep in mind when it comes to this topic.

First and foremost, it is important to remember that a child’s decision to not see a parent is their own and should not be taken lightly. It is a serious decision that should not be made without a lot of thought and consideration. If a child chooses not to see a parent, it is usually because they feel like they are not being heard or that their opinions do not matter. This can be a very frustrating and damaging experience for a child, so it is important to try to repair the relationship if at all possible.

That being said, there are cases in which a child may choose not to see a parent due to abuse or neglect. If this is the case, it is important to seek professional help in order to protect the child.

In general, a child can make the decision to not see a parent at any age. There is no set age at which this decision must be made. It is a decision that should be based on the individual child and their specific situation.

How long does a father have to be absent to lose his rights in Pennsylvania?

In the state of Pennsylvania, a father can lose his rights to his child if he is absent for a period of one year. This is determined by the courts, and it is not automatic. The father will have to go to court and petition to have his rights terminated. If the court finds that the father has been absent for a year, and that he has not made any attempts to contact the child or to support the child financially, then the father’s rights will be terminated.

Can a 13 year old decide where he wants to live?

Can a 13 year old decide where he wants to live?

This is a question that is asked by parents all over the world, as they try to decide what is best for their child. The answer to this question is not always black and white, as there are many factors that need to be considered.

One thing to consider is the age of the child. Generally speaking, a child who is 13 years old is not old enough to make a decision about where he wants to live. He may have an opinion about where he would like to live, but it is up to his parents to decide what is best for him.

There are a few factors that parents need to consider when making this decision. One is the child’s age and maturity level. Another is the child’s school and social life. Parents also need to think about their own needs and what is best for the whole family.

If the child is younger than 13, then it is generally recommended that he live with his parents. This is especially true if the child is still in school. It is important for the child to have a stable home life and to be able to stay close to his friends and family.

If the child is older than 13, then there may be some factors that weigh in favour of allowing him to live on his own. For example, if the child is doing well in school and has a good support system of friends and family, then it may be okay for him to live on his own.

Parents should talk to their child about their thoughts on where they would like to live. They should also listen to their child’s reasoning and take it into consideration. However, in the end, it is the parents who need to make the final decision about where their child will live.