At What Age Can A Child Decide Which Parent They Want To Live With

At what age can a child decide which parent they want to live with?

There is no definite answer to this question as it varies from child to child. In most cases, a child will make this decision around the age of 12 or 13. However, there are some instances where a child may choose to live with one parent over the other as early as age 9 or 10. And, on the other hand, there are also cases where a child does not make a decision until they are older, such as 16 or 17.

What factors will influence a child’s decision?

There are a few key factors that will generally influence a child’s decision on which parent they want to live with. These include the child’s relationship with each parent, the living situation of each parent, and the child’s age.

If a child has a good relationship with both parents and they are living in a stable environment, the child is more likely to choose to live with both parents. However, if the child has a poor relationship with one parent or they are living in an unstable environment, the child is more likely to choose to live with the other parent.

Additionally, a child’s age will play a role in their decision. Younger children are more likely to want to live with both parents, while older children are more likely to want to live with the parent they have a stronger relationship with.

What if a child doesn’t want to live with a parent?

If a child does not want to live with a parent, there are a few possible options. One option is for the child to live with the other parent. Another option is for the child to live with a relative or other guardian. If the child does not have any other living relatives, he or she may be placed in foster care.

At what age can a child refuse to see a parent in SC?

In South Carolina, a child can refuse to see a parent at any age, as long as the child is capable of making that decision. The child’s reason for refusing to see the parent does not matter. If the child is old enough to express their wishes, their opinion will be respected.

If one of the parents is trying to get custody of the child and the child is refusing to see that parent, the court will take the child’s wishes into account. However, the court will also consider the child’s best interests, and may decide that the child should have contact with the parent even if the child doesn’t want to see them.

Can a 10 year old decide which parent to live with in PA?

Can a 10 year old decide which parent to live with in PA?

There is no easy answer to this question. Pennsylvania law states that a child over the age of 10 years old can choose which parent to live with, but this may not be in the child’s best interest.

If the parents are divorced, the child will usually live with the parent who has been awarded custody by the court. If the parents are still married, the child will usually live with the parent who has been designated as the primary residential parent by the court.

If the parents cannot agree on which parent the child should live with, the court will make a decision based on the best interests of the child. The court will consider a number of factors, including the child’s age and relationship with each parent, the parents’ ability to provide for the child’s needs, and the child’s wishes, if he or she is old enough to express them.

If you are facing a custody dispute and need help deciding what is in your child’s best interest, you should speak to an experienced family law attorney.

What do I do if my child doesn’t want to see his dad?

When a divorcing couple has children, the question of child custody often arises. One of the parents may be awarded custody, while the other is granted visitation rights. When a child doesn’t want to see his dad, it can be a difficult situation for all involved.

There are a few things you can do if your child doesn’t want to see his dad. The first step is to talk to your child about why he doesn’t want to see his dad. It’s possible that the child is afraid or doesn’t feel safe with the other parent. He may also be angry about the divorce or feel like he’s been abandoned.

If you can’t determine the reason for your child’s reluctance, you may need to seek the help of a therapist. The therapist can help you and your child work through the issues that are preventing him from seeing his dad.

If your child is afraid or doesn’t feel safe with the other parent, you may need to consider changing the custody arrangement. You can talk to your ex-spouse about switching to a joint custody arrangement or even giving the other parent full custody.

If your child is angry or resentful about the divorce, you may need to give him some time to heal. You can encourage him to spend time with his dad and tell him how much his dad loves him. You can also help him express his feelings by writing a letter to his dad or drawing a picture.

No matter what the reason for your child’s reluctance to see his dad, it’s important to stay positive and supportive. Be there to listen to your child and help him work through his feelings. With time and patience, your child may eventually be ready to see his dad again.

What is poor co-parenting?

What is poor co-parenting?

Good co-parenting is key to a happy and successful child. However, when co-parenting is poor, it can lead to a number of problems for the child. These can include emotional and behavioral problems, problems in school, and difficulties forming relationships.

There are a number of things that can contribute to poor co-parenting. These can include unresolved anger or resentment between the parents, unrealistic expectations, and a lack of communication.

Poor co-parenting can have a serious impact on the child. It can lead to the child feeling confused, unsupported, and anxious. It can also cause the child to feel like they have to take on a role in the family that is not appropriate for their age.

If you are experiencing difficulty co-parenting with your partner, it is important to seek help. There are a number of resources available, including counseling and parent education classes. It is important to work to resolve the issues causing the problems, so that the child can thrive.

What is parent alienation?

Parent alienation is a term used to describe a situation where one parent tries to turn a child against the other parent. This can be done through verbal attacks, manipulation, or other means.

Parent alienation can have a devastating effect on children. They may feel confused and torn between their parents. They may also feel guilty and responsible for the conflict.

If you are experiencing parent alienation, it is important to seek help. There are professionals who can help you deal with this situation. You can also reach out to support groups for parents who are going through this.

What is the average child support payment in South Carolina?

The average child support payment in South Carolina is $232 per month. That number is based on the most recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau, which shows that the average monthly payment in the state is $2,784.

While the average payment is $232, the amount that families actually receive can vary significantly. That’s because the amount that’s paid is based on a variety of factors, including income and the number of children being supported.

In South Carolina, the child support guidelines are set by the state legislature. The guidelines take into account both parents’ incomes and the cost of raising a child.

The parent who is not the primary custodian of the child typically pays child support to the primary custodian. In most cases, the non-custodial parent pays the custodial parent directly.

If you’re facing a child support dispute, it’s important to speak with an experienced attorney. The laws governing child support can be complex, and an attorney can help ensure that you’re treated fairly under the law.